The graphics are old and low resolution.

The game is only fifteen minutes long.

And it's one of the most profound experiences I have ever had.

I'm not sure that Thirty Flights of Loving is a game, not really. It's a 3D world, you interact with it, and, more importantly, you interact with it at your own pace. It has all the controls you might expect in a first person game: forward, right, left, back, diagonal, jump, interact... and it does things with them. It doesn't say a word, except in text: the bar's bottles are exclusively maple syrup, the latest news about Mecha Presidente is posted on the wall, wanted posters flip onto the displays...

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There's not really a lot I can say without spoiling the story; the game is, after all, only a few minutes long, making it somewhat challenging to discuss. I want to talk about the cats and the oranges and the moment and I can't do any of that, because if I do, and you haven't played it, then I may just ruin it for you.

Thirty Flights of Loving is less of a story and more of a series of emotional moments, tied together. To really appreciate it, think of the game like a series of memories, after the fact, rather than you existing in a moment in time. It's not a simulation, it's a reflection.

As vague as this bit is, it's also extremely spoil—Wait. No. I can't spoil this. It's a moment to be discussed. A moment that should only really be talked about between people who've played the game before.

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Pick up Thirty Flights of Loving now. Play through Gravity Bone, the included precursor, first (it's important, but the platforming segment is a bit annoying), then follow it up with Thirty Flights of Loving. Open yourself up to the feelings the game presents. Look on your experience as if they were memories of an intensely emotional time in your life. Because the game's moments don't play like a story, they play like a past.

Ultimately, you choose when Thirty Flights of Loving ends. For me, I never wanted it to, not in those final moments, but at the same time, I knew it had to end; I had to let go.

So I did.

...But only for a little while. I've come back time and time again, and I will continue to do so. These memories aren't mine, not exactly, but then again, I played the game, so they are. I lived a life that wasn't mine, and in doing so, I experienced feelings and emotions I'd never felt before. They were beautiful.

I hope you get to experience it too.