Last week, we had two E3 conferences.

One conference was 90 minutes of nothing but games, nearly all of which were games we didn't know about. Only five were available on other platforms, and of those, two were still brand new—the rest were only available on that platform. No TV, no motion crap, just games and only games, from some of the best developers on the planet. Oh, and they said they'd be giving free games that wouldn't be restricted by premium services should you wish to cancel said services.

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The other conference had them talking about TV, showing games we already knew about, talking about sports, announcing third-party games that would be available on multiple platforms (many of which had already been announced), and only announcing one or two new games. Even worse, part of the conference was dedicated to trying to sell a game that was launching that week. Oh, and they added new payment requirements for playing games, but acted like this was somehow a good thing.

The former "lost" and the latter "won."

Why?

Because the latter was Sony, who said "we will let you play and resell games normally," and the former was Microsoft, who said nothing, but had announced their DRM stuff the week prior. Even worse, misinformation has constantly been spread that Microsoft's games were almost all available on other platforms—which is false; nearly all of Microsoft's games shown were exclusive to their platforms, while a good 90% of the games shown at Sony's conference are already available (or will be soon) on other, better platforms, like the PC.

Now Microsoft's policies have changed.

Now, what we have, is a conference that was nothing but games, nearly all of which were exclusive to the Xbox or Xbox One, and we have a bloated, fat conference that didn't announce many new games and seemed more focused on saying "we're better" than actually proving it by bringing it where the games were concerned.

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What do you care about more? Arrogance—the same that Jack Tretton has brought to basically every E3 ever—or games? Now that Microsoft's DRM policies are no longer a problem, it's okay to admit that they had a stupendous showing of games, right?

Added tidbit: we know for a fact that Microsoft has even more games in store, like Rare's first AAA game since the astonishingly good Viva Pinata: Trouble in Paradise, the Fable remake, the new Harmonix Fantasia game, Zoo Tycoon, and some other stuff as well.