I know it’s unfair to hold a Call of Duty narrative to a high standard of something like Mass Effect or Bioshock. The series isn’t known to deliver any complex characters or social politico in-sight of world like Call of Duty (aside from the nonfiction wars). However, that doesn’t mean I won’t compare it to a good action film, and the latest installments of Call of Duty can easily be labeled as the Micheal Bay of videogames.

I booted up Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare, after finishing Persona 5 (150+ Hrs), and wanted nothing more than a mindless head. Instead, I was in for nauseated nights, and dreadful headaches.

Literally my face playing this game.

Playing it, I can’t help but to notice all the missed potential COD:IW had. I really liked the premise of the story: there are two worlds at war with each other, in a American Revolution like scenario, where the people of Mars are trying to secede from Earth. But that gets ruined as the enemies are turned into space Nazis, unexpectedly.

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Infinity Ward did some cool experimental mechanics like using a zip line in zero-g battlegrounds, and the space dogfights that take me back to the N64 days. All of it over stays its welcome, however, and add no new variation to keep it fresh after its first appearance.

But my biggest gripe lies in the games action sequences and over the top moments; they are simply lackluster in comparison to Infinity Ward’s other Call of Duty projects.

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The pace, for example, is painfully sluggish. It follows your traditional padding, action, padding pattern, but the padding makes for the great portion of the missions. And the padding isn’t all that interesting to watch or listen to either. COD:IW lacks those large over the top action moments, and the moments that did happen left me high and dry. It also ironically made a 5-hour game feel like the longest day of my life.

A lot of the first-person cinematic sequences lacked a proper focus point for comfortable eye direction, as well. I found myself searching the scene virtually and physically for what I should look at, and only catching glimpses of the thing before it exited off stage or blew up in my face throwing me around without a clue of knowing where my eyes should rest at for the duration of the scene.

Too true.

I slogged my way across COD:IW’s campaign because I’m lowkey a masochist, and I wanted to see if it got any better in the end. The answer is no. I hate dissing on Call of Duty. It’s too easy of a target, and it’s beyond a dead horse at this point. But I still believe we should hold some gold standard to the action that happens in COD.