With the announcement of Battlefield 1 a few weeks ago, my interest in the First World War has been reignited. DICE seems to be dedicated to staying as true as possible (as much as a triple-A FPS can) to the reality of the war, and based on the trailer they seem to be succeeding. While there are some obvious liberties taken, history buffs have verified that much of the hardware and locations shown in the reveal trailer are more true to life than many average people thought. Funny how a video game can spark interest in something that isn’t normally thought of these days.

This was one of the analysis videos I clicked on, and I was most interested in the historical perspective. The host, Indiana Neidell, walks through the trailer frame by frame pointing out as much real-life equipment, vehicles and locations and comments on their accuracy, and for the most part the game seems to be nailing it. What interested me most, though, was the channel itself.

The Great War was launched on the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I, and the stated goal of the channel is to give a weekly update of what happened exactly one hundred years prior during the war. As we are already two years past that, there are hours of content on the channel already covering nearly every aspect of the world’s most horrific war. With several uploads a week, the channel provides a unique way to learn about the war with roughly ten minute videos covering specific topics between the weekly updates on what happened one hundred years ago on that date.

As of writing this, the most recent update covers one of the war’s more important naval battles, The Battle of Jutland. The channel provides a chronological playlist of every upload, or if two years worth of content is too daunting to tackle, a shorter summary series to quickly catch up new viewers to the current point. It’s a highly unique project on Youtube that doesn’t have as much recognition as it deserves. While it might not cover a ton of new topics for WWI buffs out there, people who are casually interested can hop in and follow along as the war unfolds, one hundred years in the past.

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