Sinbad, born David Adkins to a Baptist Rev in 1956, should be your choice for the DigiDestined. He grew up with 5 siblings. 5. That’s insane.

Sinbad would go on to join the marching band and the match club in high school, puting those skills to use at the University of Denver where he lettered in athletics. However all would not go to plan for young David Adkins, as an injury would sideline him not just from basketball but also from his dreams.

DigiDestined.

So it was that his legend would grow through his time in the Air Force. Some even say he would perform comedy on the side. We don’t know if this is in fact truth or more myths surrounding a great man, but we know one thing for sure: he would change the entire world when he performed on Star Search in the early 80s.

Star Search, a program we used before the internet to find the greatest talents the world had to offer so as to thrust greatness upon them, was where Sinbad would first show that special something he had. His DigiDestiny. America would be changed forever. Within hours of his first appearance the one word on everyone’s lips was “Sinbad” and then “is that even a name? Like seriously.”

However in a tragedy with which only events like the sinking of the Titanic and crashing in the Andes can compare Sinbad would lose this competition to the guy who would become the Crypt Keeper on Tales from the Crypt.

It was too late, America had Sinbad fever and there was only one cure: Sinbad. Throughout the 80s and 90s Sinbad would be given to us in both an injection from through his comedy specials but also his appearances on programs like “Time Out: The Truth about HIV, AIDS, and You”. Who else from Digimon would spread an important message about health in a time of national panic? What’s more it was with Sinbad’s efforts that these problems finally could be talked about openly. Newspapers covered stories about AIDS and HIV after this, grown men wept, really it was something nobody else from Digimon could really compete with.

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But have we talked about the comedy? This was a genius who thrived on telling it to America like they’d never heard it before. How did he tell it?

He told it like it is.

Of course those of you too young to appreciate this might think we always used to tell it like it was in America. Bullshit not until Sinbad. He would say things to the audiences face that showed them as being complicit in the problems of their own life, and they would not react with violence or hurt feelings: they laughed.

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His great works wouldn’t end there: Coneheads, The Meteor Man, Houseguest. When we talk about what the great comedies of the 90s were we can’t have that conversation without Sinbad. It just doesn’t happen. But then First Kid, Jingle All the Way, and Good Burger. When we talk about the legacy of comedy on film we can’t have that conversation without mentioning Sinbad either.

What does he do nowadays? Well besides voicing a character on Steven Universe? He is once again reinventing himself is a force for change. If ever there was a person who was DigiDestined it was Sinbad. America’s one true gift to the world of the arts.

His performance at MacWorld in 2011 is probably the greatest accomplishment from a career that spans over 4 decades. A person might expect a performance that was playing to the audience, telling them what they wanted to hear about system architecture and Jobs’ design principles. No. He told it like it is.

As much as a character from Digimon might deserve to be the DigiDestined, and conventional wisdom would point to that conclusion, we must be honest with ourselves. We have to be truthful to ourselves that there probably wouldn’t be a world for Digimon to exist in if not for Sinbad and his good works. No single age has found a single man so clearly it’s personification as Sinbad is for ours. Please, when you go to the polls to vote for the DigiDestined remember Sinbad.